Dianah Mieglich

As we head towards 2050 and beyond, our society will be faced with many challenges.

Climate change, food security, equality, justice, health and welfare challenges are but a few. Here I share my thoughts and observations about many current and continuing issues. I would be pleased to receive your feedback and I invite you to join me in the conversations.

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Port Germein Gorge - Its blood flows again

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Nature is a splendid thing. The regeneration and rejuvenation of the Port Germein Gorge and the Southern Flinders, following the devastating January fires, is remarkable.  

Just yesterday, as I drove north towards the Southern Flinders Ranges and as the Bluff came into view, the scars of the January fires were more apparent.  The starkness of the Range took on the appearance of leather in need of nourishment.  The type of leather of old boots, old boots which had walked too many miles and endured too much sun. 

With the final days of the winter sun high in the sky the scenery is distinguished.  I am confident the vista will respond to nourishment, by way of moisture and care, just as old boots would. The country needs rain. 

As I turned due east, off the Augusta highway and climbed the gentle rise of the foothills, I wasn't quite prepared for the brightness of the sun as it shone through, not filtered by the leaves that prior to January were once on the majestic gums. 

As I meandered through the gorge I stopped along the way to capture images of the landscapes around each bend.  As I stepped out of the car and onto the newly paved road my shoes stuck to tar, not quite set.  The distinctive smell of bitumen and gravel filled my nostrils.  As I walked down an embankment the scent was soon overpowered with the perfume of damp earth, eucalyptus and Flinders Range wattle blossom on the ether. 

A pair of Galahs foraged in freshly spread straw and earth, a manmade mattress to support new growth and hold the topsoil in place. I listened to their chatter.  All at once a chorus of bird songs rang out like a symphony and a blue crane flapped its wings in time as it took off, startled by my presence.  

I am told that for those who entered the gorge and its environs only days after the fires that the silence was deafening.  No bird songs because there were no birds.  No mammals, lizards or other life to speak of.  However, if one looked in a discerning fashion, small buds and shoots were already appearing on scorched florae. Whilst the threat of Rachel Carson's 'Silent Spring' threatens the world in general, here for the moment, nature was in fine song.  

Now a day before spring, the first anniversary of the devastating fires is nearer than the original event of January this year.  It wasn’t just the evidence of the destruction of the fires which was striking but the signs of erosion caused by the torrents of water which descended upon the parched and charcoaled landscape.   In a peculiar twist of fate it was the equally devastating rain which did eventually quell the immortal monster of a blaze, enabling control to be taken by mortal men and women.

Wild oats now grow high, sentries to resilience, dangerous fuel for a hungry fire yet to be born. The air is warm, too warm really.  Are we ready for the next fire danger season?  

For those of you living in our beautiful regions, have you prepared your property?  Do you have a plan in place? I know many who do.  For those who do not....three words should motivate you to be at the ready.  Prepare. Act. Survive.   

Blessings be bestowed upon those who have not stopped rebuilding nor grieving.

Never rest, never take for granted our beautiful surroundings or the unforgiving climate in which we live.

Footnote: Special mention to the contractors and volunteers who have all contributed to the rebuilding of this important artery in the Southern Flinders Ranges. 

Some incredible footage of the painstaking and environmentally-sensitive repairs can be found at this link:

http://dpti.sa.gov.au/newconnections/article?item=499

 

 

 

 

 

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A proud South Australian, Dianah is family and community focused. She has a strong work ethic and commits fully to any role she undertakes – whether it is in a paid or voluntary capacity.
Dianah is an excellent communicator, an empathetic listener and is known for her ability to grasp a sense of the ‘bigger picture’ in her work, family and community life.

With 30 years of grassroots public and community service under her belt Dianah is ready to take her passion for her community as far as she can. Following an unsuccessful Senate bid in 2013 Dianah is now focussing on the future and continued advocacy for her regional community.
Dianah spent four-and-a-half years (2009 - 2013) as Assistant to Independent Member for Frome Geoff Brock MP. This has inspired and motivated her to continue in public service in a voluntary capacity. Among other employment, Dianah has worked for Centrelink, Social Security and Regional Development Australia Yorke & Mid North and is passionate about volunteering. Her children are third generation CFS Cadets. Dianah is currently self employed.

Embracing change, Dianah is an ardent advocate for regional communities, a proud Republican and a staunch supporter of legalising Medical Cannabis and Industrial Hemp. Dianah is also a keen supporter of the State's seafood industry and all facets of primary production.
Dianah's mantra is "Without our environment we have no economy." Dianah believes securing our food and water into the future is not something we should hope for but rather something we should strive for.
Dianah shares a global view.

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